Slideshows are a very common type of presentation that conveys information in a series of informational graphics and texts. There are multiple ways to create a slideshow and have it switch slides. Additionally, one may find it useful to integrate more elaborate designs into their slideshows such as animations or transitions between slides to slide.

For the purposes of brevity, this tutorial will demonstrate how to switch to different slides using the arrow keys, which is one of the most common ways to move from one slide to the next. It will also show how to integrate a popular transition known as fading while moving when switching slides.

Programming a slideshow project can occur at any time of the production process.

Green Flag Script

Build this script for when the Green Flag is clicked.

when gf clicked
switch costume to [costume1 v]
go to x: (10) y: (-10)
set [is clone? v] to [0] //"is clone?" is a local variable.
create clone of [myself v]
hide
forever
if <key [left arrow v] pressed?> then
broadcast [last v]
wait until <not <key [left arrow v] pressed?>>
else
if <key [right arrow v] pressed?> then
broadcast [next v]
wait until <not <key [right arrow v] pressed?>>
end
end

Next Broadcast

This script commences when the right arrow is pressed.

when I receive [next v]
if <(is clone?) = [0]> then
next costume
go to x: (10) y: (-10)
create clone of [myself v]
else
repeat (20)
change x by (-1)
change y by (1)
change [ghost v] effect by (10)
end
delete this clone
end

Last Broadcast

This script commences when the left arrow is pressed.

when I receive [last v]
if <(is clone?) = [0]> then
next costume
go to x: (-30) y: (30)
create clone of [myself v]
else
repeat (20)
change x by (1)
change y by (-1)
change [ghost v] effect by (10)
end
delete this clone
end

Clone Starting

This is the script when a clone is created.

when I start as a clone
show
go back (99) layers
set [is clone? v] to [1]
set [ghost v] effect to (100)
if <(y position) = [30]> then
repeat (20)
change [ghost v] effect by (-10)
change x by (1)
change y by (-1)
end
else
repeat (20)
change [ghost v] effect by (-10)
change x by (-1)
change y by (1)
end
end

Backdrop

text
This image can be used as the backdrop.

Backdrops often are single-colored, and usually black or white.

Images can also be used as a backdrop, however, this is often discouraged as it tends to be distracting to viewers and text may not be easily seen.

Design Tips

For best results to viewers, slideshows should follow these guidelines:

  • Avoid distracting transitions, formats, texts, backdrops, or images. Even though it may add uniqueness to a presentation, it takes away a viewer's attention to the important content.
    • Instead, opt for a simpler format with contrasting colors (for example, text should be either black or white and contrasting to the backdrop).
    • Presentations that use animations that "flow" (such as a portion of content being displayed one at a time) is generally not distracting and may help a viewer focus on that specific point. Again, keep in mind that this will depend on the type of animation that is in the project.
  • If presenting a project in a public setting such as a school, consider making the points and content as consise as possible. A presenter will often elaborate on those points in his or her talk.
  • Have a mix of images, text, and diagrams - no one wants to look at a wall of text or out-of-context images.
  • Make sure texts and images are easy to read, even from far away. Testing ease of visibility by not using full screen and looking slighly farther from the computer screen can help gague whether the content needs to be enlarged or not.