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Reason: Not a proper how-to guide. Reads like instruction booklet.

A typewriter simulator is a simulation project where you can type notes, like in Microsoft Word©. This typewriter tutorial only requires simple scripting.

Creation

Step 1

First, create a sprite. You can call it whatever you want, but for this example, it will be called "Text".

Step 2

Now, click the "Costumes" button above the block palette, and change the mode to vector. You will need to create a new costume with the letter "a", uppercase or lowercase. Name the costume "a".

Step 3

Repeat step 2 listed above 25 more times, except with different letters of the alphabet. First you do "a", then "b", and so on.

Step 4

Now that you have all of the costumes, click the "Scripts" button, right next to the "Costumes" button. Go to the More Blocks section, and create a block that looks like this:

print [] size () // category=custom

Once you finish, a "Define" hat should appear. It will be defined later on.

Step 5

Click the Data button, and create a variable that is open to all sprites and named "letter on?".

Step 6

Remember the define block that was created earlier? In this step, it will be defined. Snap the following blocks underneath the define block so that the script looks like this:

define print [text] size (size)
set [letter on? v] to [1]
repeat (length of (text))
switch costume to (letter (letter on?) of (text)
stamp
change [letter on? v] by (1)
change x by (size)
end

Step 7

Now, you have two different choices. You can choose whichever one you like better.

Step 7a

One method of detecting which keys are pressed can be the 26-script way. It's like this:

First, create a script like this:

when [a v] key pressed
print [a] size (width of costumes) // category=custom

When using this method, you need to repeat the script 25 more times, but each with a different letter of the alphabet. First "a", then "b", and so on.

Step 7b

Another method of detecting which keys are pressed can be the 1-script way. First, create a script like this:

when gf clicked
forever
if <key [a v] pressed?>
print [a] size (width of costumes) // category=custom
else

end

The next step is to copy the "if else" part and stick it in the first "if else"'s "else". Change the "<key [a v] pressed" to "key [b v] pressed" and change the "print [a]..." to "print [b]...". Keep on doing this until you get to "y". This part is different, and should look like this:

...
if <key [y v] pressed?>
print [y] size (width of costumes) // category=custom
else
if <key [z v] pressed?>
print [z] size (width of costumes // category=custom
end
end
wait (delay time) secs
end forever block // category=control

Conclusion

If you followed all of the above steps, you should now have a working typewriter simulator!