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==What A Typewriter Simulator Is==
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A typewriter simulator is a [[Simulation_Projects|simulation project]] where you can type notes, like in Microsoft Word©. This typewriter tutorial only requires simple scripting.
A typewriter simulator is a [[Simulation_Projects|simulation project]], where you can type to write notes, like Microsoft Word©. They do take a little while to make, but the scripting is simple.
 
  
 
==How To Make One==
 
==How To Make One==

Revision as of 17:28, 7 June 2014

A typewriter simulator is a simulation project where you can type notes, like in Microsoft Word©. This typewriter tutorial only requires simple scripting.

How To Make One

Step 1

First, create a sprite. You can call it whatever you want, but for our example, we'll call it "Text".

Step 2

Now, click the "Costumes" button above the block palette, and change the mode to vector. Now, type the letter "a", uppercase or lowercase. Name the costume "a".

Step 3

Repeat step 2 listed above 25 more times, except with different letters of the alphabet. First you do "a", then "b", and so on.

Step 4

Now that you have all of the costumes, click the "Scripts" button, right next to the "Costumes" button. Go to the More Blocks section, and create a block that looks like this:

print [] size () // category=custom

Now, a "Define" hat should appear. We will create it's script later.

Step 5

Click the Data button, and create a variable that is open to all sprites, not cloud and named "letter on?".

Step 6

Remember the define block that appeared earlier? We are now going to add some things to it. Snap the following blocks to it so the script looks like this:

define print [text] size (size)
set [letter on? v] to [1]
repeat (length of (text))
switch costume to (letter (letter on?) of (text)
stamp
change [letter on?] by (1)
change x by (size)
end

Step 7

Now, you have two different choices. You can choose whichever one you like better.

Step 7a

One method of detecting which keys are pressed can be the 26-script way. It's like this:

First, create a script like this:

when key [a v] pressed
print [a] size (width of costumes) // category=custom

When using this method, you repeat the script 25 more times, but each with a different letter of the alphabet. First "a", then "b", and so on.

Step 7b

Another method of detecting which keys are pressed can be the 1-script way. First, create a script like this:

when gf clicked
forever
if <key [a v] pressed?>
print [a] size (width of costumes) // category=custom
else

end

Now, copy the "if else" part and stick it in the first "if else"'s "else". Change the "<key [a v] pressed" to "key [b v] pressed" and change the "print [a]..." to "print [b]...". Keep on doing this until you get to "y". The last part should look like this:

...
if <key [y v] pressed?>
print [y] size (width of costumes) // category=custom
else
if <key [z v] pressed?>
print [z] size (width of costumes // category=custom
end
end
wait (delay time) secs
end forever block // category=control

Conclusion

If you followed all of the above steps, you should now have a working typewriter!